A Pretty Long Note About Titles

Part of our game involves using titles as a sign of recognition for achievement in different areas of what we do.  Don't worry though, it takes a while to get used to all the titles, but you can always call someone "m'lord" or "m'lady."

Royalty

credit: Denise Clark

King/Queen: Rulers of a Kingdom. Position is won by combat. Sometimes called the Sovereign and Consort if the winner of the Crown List is the female fighter of the pair. In these cases, she is called “Queen in Her Own Right.” In most Kingdoms the reign is six months. They are addressed as “Your Majesty,” and wear big, fancy Crowns. Crown Heirs - If Crown List has been held, there is usually about a couple of months before these Heirs become the new King and Queen. They are the Crown Prince and Crown Princess during this time. They are addressed “Your Highness,” and wear big, fancy crowns too.

Prince/ Princess: Some Kingdoms have sub-divisions called Principalities, their rulers win this position by combat. In most Principalities, They rule for six months and are addressed “Your Highness,” or referred to as His/Her Highness. They may also be referred to by an adjective related to the name of the Principality (as in the former Principality of the Sun, the Prince was called “His Solar Highness”). They wear Coronets, usually with the symbol of the Principality on them.

Nobility

Landed Baron/Baroness: Are rulers of a Barony. This position is attained by vote of the populace and approval by the Crown. They rule for 2-5 years at a time. They are called “Your Excellency,” and wear Coronet pointed front and back with symbols of the Barony on them. Court Barons/esses (former holders of lands) wear coronets topped with spheres.

Royal Peers

Duke/Duchess: Given to people who have ruled as Crown two or more times. They are called “Your Grace” and wear Coronets with clusters of strawberry leaves on the front, back, and each side.

Count/Countess: Given to people who have ruled as Crown once. They are called “Your Excellency,” and wear Coronets with embattled edges.

Viscount/Viscountess: Given to people who have ruled as Prince and Princess of a Principality one or more times. They are called “Your Excellency,” and wear pointed coronets.

 

Peers of the Realm

credit: Denise Clark

The Order of the Chivalry: Given for high achievement in the Arts of armored combat. Knights are in fealty to the Crown, Masters of Arms usually do not swear fealty. Most Knights are called “Sir” whether male or female, and wear a chain of fealty (unadorned gold chain), white belt, and spurs. Masters of Arms are called “Master” or “Mistress” and wear a white baldric.

The Order of the Laurel: Given for high achievement in one or more of the Arts and Sciences. Laurels are called “Master” or “Mistress” and wear a medallion with a Laurel wreath on it.

The Order of the Pelican: Given for high achievement in the area of Service. Pelicans are called “Master” or “Mistress” and wear a medallion with a Pelican on it. In period, the Pelican was thought to nourish its young with blood from its own breast if necessary, and thus became a symbol of the ultimate civil servant.

The Order of the Masters of Defense: Given for high achievement in the area of light combat. Masters of Defense are called “Master” or “Mistress” and wear a collar and a medallion with three crossed rapiers on it. 

Armigers

As a recognition of one's efforts, the Crown may bestow an Award of Arms. Some awards carry an AOA with them. Those who have been awarded arms by the Crown are called "Lady" or "Lord" . At the next highest level of armigerous award is the "Grant of Arms" which is also part of several other awards. Those with a grant carry the title "The Honorable Lord/Lady" which is only used in formal/ceremonial occasions and are referred to as "His Lordship" and "Her Ladyship". 

Other forms of Address

If you do not have at least an Award of Arms or any other title you can refer to yourself or someone of unknown rank as “M’lord” or “M’lady”. It is acceptable to use for everyone, even Royalty, if you don’t know the person’s rank.